news

Coming Out Atheist…Almost.

My mother is visiting for a few days as she attends a local conference. We get along well and have been talking over various topics like jobs, memories, family get-togethers, and so forth. Tonight, the conversation turned to my relationship with my Man (If you’re reading this, baby, don’t be Read more…

Christianity

Atheists Turning to Christianity

BelieveMotivational In the most recent issue of Christianity Today, Charles Colson--owner of an infamous scandal-to-salvation testimony--takes on your favorite topic and mine: Atheism. I'll respond to his article, When Atheists Believe, but I recommend checking it out for yourself to see if it sparks any thoughts. Colson's main point is that quite a few well-known atheists have come to Christianity after--as he claims--examining the rationality of the religion.

Faith and reason are not enemies. We are given reason as a gift. And while we can't reason our way to God (only the power of God can transform fallen men—I've seen that in prisons for over 32 years), I have long believed that Christianity is the most rational explanation of reality. And that fact, winsomely explained, can powerfully influence thinking people to consider Christ's claims.
Why can't we reason our way to God? Because God is not reasonable! If he was, then we could know about him using our "god-given" gift. No leaps of faith necessary. What this article does not do is explain why faith in a deity is rational. Perhaps I expect too much. Colson claims that "the Bible speaks most accurately to the human condition—the very definition of a rational choice. It is rational to choose the worldview that provides the best choice for living, consistent with the way life works." What does this have to do with: an eternal, invisible a god, a magical (yet genetically inherited) sinful nature that dooms us to agony, talking snakes, global floods, men living in fish for 3 days, magical objects, blood sacrifices, prophecies, or god-sponsored atrocities? What is "rational" about this "worldview" that teaches about a demigod who: was born of a deity-impregnated-virgin, came down to teach to one small ethnic group for a few years, sacrificed himself in a brutal manner to himself, rose bodily from the dead, floated into the sky to be with the invisible deity-daddy, and who runs an exclusive "love me or be tortured for eternity" club based on thought crime? That's what we're calling the "most accurate" depiction of and solution to the human condition? Mythology? (more…)

history

The Original Godless Girl

The Godless Girl was a rebel, promoting science and secularism in her university. She passed out fliers proclaiming “Man made God!”, and lead a group called The Godless Society. School authorities attempted to stop the “blasphemous” behavior, and eventually this girl was sent to reform school. After a harrowing experience Read more…

science and skepticism

Your Daily Woo: Parents Refuse Chemo for Kid & Choose Mud Instead

Why is woo dangerous? I could pontificate for pages, but instead let's look at a more-than-worthy example of some serious woo woo that is putting a child's life on the line:

... A 14 year old girl, Tamar, was recently diagnosed with liver cancer which required immediate and aggressive chemotherapy. But her parents have shunned conventional treatment in favour of "mud" therapy. A team of oncologists at Princes Margaret Childrens' Hospital advised that a seven week course of chemotherapy would give Tamar a 50-60% chance of survival. Despite the treating hospital pleading with the parents to consent to chemotherapy, eventually seeking the involvement of the WA legal system, the parents fled Australia to El Salvador. Their preferred treatment is tea made from herbs, and red clay gathered from around the hills near their house in El Salvador. Tamar's mother says that "Clay is basically the right medicine for any kind of illness, (it can cure) anything". She went on to say, "..it dries up anything that is causing the illness in your system".
(source)

You've got to see the footage to believe it:

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